The Terror of 403

Apologies if you have been trying to reach this site in the last two weeks or so. A terrifying error-message which blazoned the word FORBIDDEN in capital letters was all you would find. A virus attack had occurred at the ISP, but it has now been sorted by my son Simon. (A million thanks!) He and I have changed ISP, and things should be back to normal.

But I ask a favour: I understand that after a change of ISP anyone who has a link to my site will not be able to re-connect, except manually. I have no access to social media, and I’d be grateful if this renewal could be made known. The URL is unchanged:


They Have Been Sent In

The image below appears on the cover of Fortean Times 347, dated December 2016.

The headline beside it reads as follows:

The creepy craze that started in America and spread across the world

My copy of FT was delivered here on 8th November. Fortean coincidence, or what?

Fortean Times, the journal of well researched and sceptical reporting of strange phenomena, the bizarre and the inexplicable, is one of the most readable, intelligent and thought-provoking magazines in existence. It is also at times extremely amusing. In a world perceptibly going mad, it is a beacon of sanity. I read it cover-to-cover as soon as it arrives. A 12-month subscription costs: UK £38.98, EC £47.50, USA $88.99.


The Day the Earth Caught Fire

The Day the Earth Caught Fire was a British science fiction film made in 1961. These days it has become a somewhat under-rated and forgotten film, but it has its moments. Told from the point of view of the journalists and editor of a Fleet Street newspaper (in fact, the Daily Express), the film depicts the fate of the world after too much nuclear testing tilts the axis of the planet. Severe climate change ensues. In the film, the only possible remedy is thought to be the setting off of even more nuclear explosions, which will in theory cause a return to normality. However, there is an equal risk that the detonations will destroy what is left of the planet.

As the moment of detonation approaches, and the characters face their destiny, the machine room of the newspaper is set to print one of two final editions. The closing image in the film is of the front pages of both editions.





I can’t help remembering this as we prepare to spend the night watching TV, waiting for salvation or doom.