Soggy

Storm Imogen blew the vanes off our local wind turbine. It left the rest of the place a bit wet underfoot. All these pictures were taken within 500 metres of our house.

Soggy Devon 3

Soggy Devon 4

From my office window 25 02 16

Soggy Devon 1

Soggy Devon 2

The Space Machine

The Space Machine ValancourtHere is the cover by Valancourt Books for their US paperback reissue of The Space Machine, which was first published by Faber & Faber some 40¬†years ago. (Yes, that’s FORTY. It’s not the sort of sentence I’m keen on writing. Read it quickly, please.) Valancourt’s edition is going on sale next month, March 2016.

Unlike a child that might have been born in 1976, The Space Machine is 40 years old only by date: it is not an adult, certainly not a middle-aged adult, but a child of its time. My time, in fact: it was my fourth novel, which I started writing more or less straight away after completing Inverted World. It is to my eyes still fresh to read, although I know that if I were to try to write something like it now I would probably muck it up. Lacking self-consciousness can be an advantage.

By the way, this year marks the 150th anniversary of H. G. Wells’s birth. His life and mine overlapped by just over three years, so I inappropriately think of him as a contemporary. I realize now, with hindsight, that my writing of this novel might seem like a bumptious act. At the time, part of what impelled me was the realization that I was then more or less the same age as Wells had been when he was writing his scientific romances — I still consider those to be his best work in fiction.